Brake pedal maintenance.

There's not a lot going on with the brake pedal on a motocross bike, but you'll think otherwise if you have to buy a new one. If you break one from a crash, that is one thing. If however, it is all messed up from lack of care, that is another. Your brake performance is critical to good motocross riding, so the condition and action of your brake pedal is no less important. What is really needed to maintain the pedal? Not much, but you should inspect it, clean all of the components and grease the pivot bolt on a regular basis.

The first step is to remove the pin that connects the pedal to the master cylinder rod (in this image, I had already cleaned and reassembled the clevis joint). Next, if it is difficult to access the pedal return spring, remove the pivot bolt while holding the pedal firmly. Otherwise, it may be easier to remove the spring first. To remove the spring, grab the end of the spring with a good set of needle nosed pliers and rotate the spring tip out of the anchoring hole at which ever end is easiest.

Getting the spring off was very easy. I was able to position the pedal in a way that I could remove it with my fingers. You can usually manage the pedal with it connected to the rod as you see here, but be careful not to bend the rod or damage the rod boot on the master cylinder. If your pedal has seals, carefully remove them while observing the direction they are mounted. Clean the pivot bore, frame mount, pedal and rod connections thoroughly.

Clean the pivot bolt, washer and seals. Be careful not to damage the seals. If you have damaged seals, replace them.

Cover the pivot bolt with a thin coat of grease such as Silkolene Pro RG2 or a good industrial/automotive EP lithium based multipurpose grease. Also put a thin coat of grease in the pedal bore and make sure to install the seals if applicable.

Tighten the bolt to the correct torque spec. Be careful not to get the washer pinched between the frame and the shoulder of the bolt and be extremely careful not to cross thread the bolt. If the bolt does not start easily, there is either something wrong with the threads or you are starting it crooked. When the bolt is tight, the washer must be free to rotate about the bolt. Connect the pedal to the master cylinder rod, but do not use grease which will attract dirt. In my opinion, it is better to frequently wash the master cylinder/pedal joint (clevis) frequently, using WD-40.

Do this maintenance procedure on a regular basis and your rear brake pedal will last a long time.

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